Category Archives: Recipes/Meals

The EBV meal

As we slowly move our fat behinds and spilling bellies into the 21st century making good food choices becomes more and more of a struggle. For instance, we first had cookies. Then we had Oreo cookies. Now we have Oreo stuffed cookies! Are you kidding me? What’s a fat boy to do?! Not eat it? Blasphemy!

While I’m super excited about what is up next, I’m also petrified about how this is going to cause an uncontrollable downward spiral of our already crashing healths. That being the case, it becomes more and more important to make good food choices on most meals so that we can live long enough to enjoy tomorrow’s awesome treats. One of my recommendations to eating right while still keeping taste, nutrition and satiety levels high is the EBV meal and this is how it works.

You eat beans, eggs and vegetables. Nothing more. Nothing less.

You will need…

  • 2 – 4 whole country/free range eggs
  • 1 – 1.5 cups pre-soaked beans (any kind. mixed is fine)
  • 1 – 2 cups raw vegetables (mixed is fine)
  • 2 teaspoons ghee or coconut oil or lard
  • Salt, pepper, spices and toppings per taste
  • 1 cup milk or yogurt (optional)

You will need to…

  • Make a serving of beans. You can make it the Indian way (daal) or mexican way or american way (chili) or my way i.e cuisineless (add stuff you like and make it taste awesome). Of course, you can very well add your 1-2 cups of vegetables and cook them along with the beans to make the cooking simple.
  • Cook your eggs. Hard boiled, sunny side up, omelet, poached they’re all fine. You can even make this a gravy and add in the vegetables if you choose to.
  • Cook your vegetables. Saute, pan fry, broiled, steamed, baked they’re all fine.Or eat ’em raw if that’s how you roll.
  • Top your vegetables and/or beans with 1-2 tbls of shredded coconut (optional of course) or raw cut onions or green mango or cheese or bacon whatever else floats your boat.
  • Other options:
    • Top the beans with vegetables and eggs.
    • Scramble the eggs along with the beans and/or vegetables.

Nutritionally, you will have consumed…

  • Calories: 500 – 900 kcal
  • Protein: 30 – 55 g
  • Carbohydrates: 50 – 85 g
  • Fiber: 15 – 22 g
  • Fats: 20 – 40 g
  • Vitamins: Plenty (depends on choice of beans and vegetables)
  • Minerals: Plenty (depends on choice of beans and vegetables)
  • Satiety: Very high due to the abundance of protein, carbs and fiber.
  • Taste: Awesome (but that’s only ‘cos I’m a pretty good cook. So suit yourself!)

And you will realize this is awesome, because…

  • The meal is filled with nutrients.
  • The meal is free from gluten, sugar, soy and other anti-nutrients.
  • You can very easily modify the meal to suit your goals be it fat loss or performance or muscle gain or general health – high/low calorie, high/low fat, high/low protein, high/low carb etc.
  • Variety is unlimited ‘cos you can vary the vegetables and beans every time (black, kidney, toor daal, pinto, moong daal, chick peas, double beans, ) and the nutritional value will still stay high up.

So next time you’re out of options for a meal, be it breakfast, lunch or dinner, soak some beans, crack some eggs, chop some vegetables and you’re good to go!

Adios!

Vegetarianism – The glass is half full

The thing about vegetarianism that I’m not a fan of is the focus on foods that ‘cannot’ be eaten. I understand the moral and religious confusion that is binding you to stay away from meat and meat products, but why the focus on the ‘cannot’ or ‘should not‘? Why not focus on the ‘can be‘ and ‘should be’ ? In other words, if you are a vegetarian you have a list of stuff that you don’t eat. But do you have a list of stuff that you should eat? Why not? Why do I hear “I don’t eat chicken ‘cos I’m vegetarian” a lot and never hear “I eat fermented dairy and spinach everyday ‘cos I’m vegetarian”?

You see my point? Why is the glass always half empty and not half full?

What is an optimal vegetarian diet?

Nutrition is nothing more than fueling yourself with nutrients. While there are moral, religious and preferential winds that influence one’s nutritional path, a good diet (and by that I mean the food you eat on a daily basis for any significant amount of time) should focus more on ‘what is needed’ than on ‘what shouldn’t be eaten’. Talking about the vegetarian diet, if you have made the choice (or have been forced to make the choice, as in most cases) to remove meat and meat products from your diet, you better find a nutritionally equivalent if you desire to live without nutritional deficiencies.

In the case of the current Indian vegetarian diet (which is possibly the only case where people are born as vegetarians and have a really hard time even considering starting to eat meat or even eggs for that matter), a replacement does exist – grains. While grains fill in the gaps (physically) and calorically, they are in no way nutritionally equivalent to meat, seafood and eggs.

Make no mistake – I’m not even hinting that all meat inclusive diets are optimal or even marginally superior to vegetarian diets. Enough junk meat and meat products are available and most people find themselves eating plenty of crappy meat/meat products that health and nutrition are not anywhere close. But when one does make an attempt to start eating real food, the vegetarians face more of a challenge than the rest.

And if you’re wondering, this applies to me too. I live in India now which is more of a vegetarian society than anything else. Even meat eaters (affectionately called “NV” or non-vigitarians) are nothing more than vegetarians who eat a little  meat. That and the fact that quality meat is not easily available, forces me to eat a vegetarian diet for the most part.

So then the question is – what is an optimal vegetarian diet? And, not surprisingly, the answer to this question is the same as for the question – what is an optimal diet? An optimal diet (vegetarian or not) is one that provides the consumer with all the nutrients required for optimal functioning.

Focusing on the half that is full

All that said, an optimal vegetarian diet should…

  • Include plenty of vegetables, especially spinach and other greens since they are abundant in Vitamin K, Vitamin A and magnesium. While this is a rule that applies to both vegetarians and meat eaters alike, it needs to be more prominent in a vegetarian diet for the reason that since most vegetarian diets are dominated by grains, vegetables are almost non-existent. Most folks tend to eat a meal of rice/wheat with some form gravy and a tiny bit of vegetables and end up neglecting vegetables. Read this article about how the Indian vegetarian diet contains no vegetables!
  • Include a significant amount of fermented foods, especially dairy due to their richness in Vitamin B12. Fermented foods help by introducing beneficial bacteria into our gut (probiotics) and adding in such bacteria has shown to be extremely beneficial to health. Relief from lactose intolerance, protection against colon cancer, reduction in IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) and urinogenital infection severity and frequency are some of the benefits. Also, vitamins available in foods are more readily available when the gut contains a healthy dose of beneficial bacteria. Whole milk yogurt/curd, natural aged cheeses, kefir, natto and tempeh are excellent choices for fermented vegetarian foods (provided they are made from top quality milk/soy beans).
  • Be rich in saturated fat. If you’re concerned/confused about saturated fat and its health consequences, read my article The Saturated Fat Scam which talks in length about why saturated fat isn’t harmful but abundantly healthy. Ghee, butter, coconut oil, coconut milk and coconut in any other form are foods that feature right at the top of the list of healthiest foods.
  • Include whole eggs. I’ve said this a million times and I will say it again – eggs are as awesome as awesome can get from a health perspective. Egg yolks are one of the healthiest foods anyone (especially vegetarians) can eat. Eggs yolks contain choline which is extremely critical for the body’s proper functioning, lutein which saves eyesight, contains essential fatty acids and healthy dose of cholesterol which, again, is a substance that is absolutely required for the body to function smoothly. Read this article by Arvind Ashok – Eat that yolk! – that talks plenty more about why you should eat whole eggs. And sorry, while the lack of protein due to an egg-less diet can be compensated for in many ways, I don’t have a nutritional substitute for eggs (especially yolks).
  • Supplement with fish oil. Fish oil is magic! It is rich in EPA & DHA (the important omega 3 fatty acids that you don’t get from flax seeds or walnuts) and Vitamins A and D and has health benefits ranging from protecting against cardiovascular diseases to protection against cancer to much improved joint health to protection against alzheimer’s and much more. I’ve written about this in the past and you can read this article to understand how beneficial fish oil truly is. While it is not in anyway a supplement, from a vegetarian’s perspective, it is best considered a medicine and gulped!
  • Obviously be devoid of allergens like gluten, industrially processed vegetable and seeds oils, preservatives, artificial sweeteners and sugars.
  • Obviously not be dependent on nutritionally inferior foods like grains.

So what might such a vegetarian diet look like?

Sample meal plan

For someone who is ~ 70 kg the following should satisfy pretty much all nutritional needs.

Breakfast

  • 1 cup whole milk (maybe coffee/tea) with 1 tsp sugar/honey
  • 2-3 idlies/dosas (or idiyappam or 1 cup poha/aval/white rice) with 3-4 tbls coconut chutney and 2 tsp ghee
  • 2-3 whole eggs with 30g cheese and 1 cup vegetables (Scrambled, omelet, sunny side up, baked, boiled, curry etc etc!)
  • 1-2 tsp cod liver oil

Lunch

  • 1 cup rice
  • 2 cups vegetables cooked in 1tbls coconut oil or ghee or butter
  • 1 cup sambar or rasam or daal
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 2 cups raw vegetables topped with 2 tsp olive oil/sesame oil (i.e. non lettuce real salad)
  • 1 medium fruit

Dinner

  • 2 cups vegetables cooked in 1tbls coconut oil or ghee or butter
  • 1 cup daal or beans or pulses pressure cooked with simple vegetables, without oil and topped with 1-2 tsp olive oil/sesame oil
  • 1 cup horsegram upma or sprouted pulses toasted with shredded coconut
  • 1 cup whole milk yogurt or raita
  • 1 medium fruit or a couple of dates or a square of dark chocolate.

Snack options

Firstly, snacks are unnecessary unless you’re actually trying to gain some weight. So snack only when absolutely required. That means, don’t look for something to munch just ‘cos you have nothing else to do. Snack if you’re unusually hungry between two meals or realize the next meal is too far away. Here are some awesome snack options which will keep you full and satisfied physically and nutritionally.

  •  2 cups mixed vegetable raita (1 cup raw cut mixed vegetables like cucumber, carrot, spinach, green mango etc + 1 cup whole milk yogurt + seasonings
  • 1 tender coconut or 1 cup salt lassi/lassi and a small fruit
  • Fruit & veg bowl – Cut up avocado, raw green mango, onions, carrots, banana stem & tomato. Top with some olive oil, lemon juice, salt and spice.
  • Flavored paneer cubes – Mix up a bunch of spices you like and toss the cubed paneer (like a dry rub) and pan fry using ghee for 2-3 min per side.
  • Mix up  10-15 chopped nuts, couple tablespoons of fresh shredded coconut, a tablespoon of raisins, pinch of salt and pepper
  • 30-40g cheese/tempeh with a cup of fresh fruit

Note: This is NOT a fat loss diet. This is meant to fix you health by fixing your gut and once you’re able to do that, well, fat loss is just a side effect of that good health you just achieved!

And just so we’re clear

  • 1 cup = 240 ml. Anytime someone tells me ‘1 cup vegetables’ they’re talking about a cup so small you can fit in like one pea and anytime (the same) someone says ‘1 cup rice’ they’re talking about a barrel so big you can easily fit in a truck! So FYI, 1 cup = 240 ml irrespective of what is in it!
  • If you weigh more or less, adjust accordingly.
  • If fat loss is the goal, eat starch only during the meal that is immediately post workout. On other meals, stick to vegetables, cheese, milk/yogurt, lentils and fruit and stop eating well before you’re full. The best foods to pull out of this plan (when looking to lose fat) are snacks, rice and fruit in that order.
  • If you feel starved, eat more of the good stuff. Stay away from starch when you don’t need it.
  • Depending on what your current nutritional deficiencies are and what diseases you suffer from presently, you will need different amounts of different foods. It is on you to figure that out.

So what do you think? Is this a template something you can stick to (80% of the time) for a lifetime? Are there more things you’d like on here? What else stops you from eating real food? Talk to me in the comments section!

Stay sane. Stay patient. Don’t be greedy for weight loss. Focus on food quality and you’ll give yourself the gift of lifelong health and fitness.

Peace out.

Sample vegetarian real food ‘diet’ or what I eat on Sundays

Sunday is my only day off and I tend to take it easy… really easy! I hang at my parent’s. I wake up late. Chill at home. Dont see any clients. Listen to plenty of music. Catch up with friends. You know… the usual drill. In addition to all this, I also make it a point to not workout and/or worry too much about food. I just like to go with the flow.

I don’t count anything. I eat per appetite. And since I’m taking it easy in general, I also like to give my gut a chance to take it easy and hence eat strictly real food.

So here is everything I ate today,

Breakfast

3-4 cups of lemon tea

  • I woke up at like 10:30am and didn’t find the need to eat breakfast as I wasn’t hungry and lunch time was around the corner. That way I get to eat with my mom and grandmom who talk memories and recipes to me. Priceless I tell you!

Lunch

– 4 cups of avial

  • The avial had green beans, potato, carrots, plenty of coconut, coconut oil and yogurt.
  • I topped that avial with 2-3 extra tbls of coconut oil and a handful of fresh shredded coconut.
  • 4 cups = 1 liter

– 3 cups spinach daal

  • Soaked lentils and fresh organic spinach cooked together with spices.
  • I topped this with about 1/2 tbls home made ghee.

– 1 cup whole milk yogurt

  • This if yogurt made at home from fresh cow’s milk

– 1 scoop (not natural, overly sweet) whey in 1/2 cup whole milk yogurt

  • ‘Cos my ON Natural Whey is at my place (and not at my parent’s)

– A handful of organic raw almonds

– 1 small banana

 Snack

– A cup of black coffee with a few almonds and raisins.

Dinner

– 2 cups of leftover avial

  • No excess coconut oil this time.

– 1/2 cup of horse gram sundal

  • Organic horse gram pre-soaked, pressure cooked and sauteed with spices in coconut oil.
  • I had this with about 1 cup of whole milk yogurt.

– Paneer subji country eggs in a tomato base

  • The paneer was home made from fresh cow’s milk
  • The subji had paneer from about a liter of milk and 2 country eggs mixed in.

– Some organic fresh papaya. Say about 1 cup.

Note: All vegetables, fruit and legumes are completely organic. You can find a list of awesome organic food stores in Chennai, India here.

So there ya go. Eating real food is simple, easy, healthy and absolutely delicious. If any of this seems to not ‘fit your style’, make it fit your style. I love avial and so I eat cartloads of it. If you don’t eat, something else there. Eat more food if you’re hungry. Eat less food if this is too much. If fat loss is a goal eat slightly below appetite, skip a meal and eat food that is less dense (skip the oil etc.). If mass gain is a goal, eat up! Eat till your slightly uncomfortable and squeeze in a breakfast and/or a snack.

Keep it real. Keep it simple. Keep it sustainable.

Peace out.

 

Macronutrient Madness – Sample Diets

Towards the end of my previous macronutrient post, I promised you folks sample diets for different goals. Since I hate nonsense talk at 5 in the morning, let’s get down to the good stuff.

Here is the deal…

  • The primary goal here is to eliminate any and all foods with gut irritating potential and only eat foods that are benign and extremely nutrient dense. This ensures that the body, in addition to getting the right macronutrients, is nourished with enough and more vitamins and minerals.
  • All diets here are designed for an imaginary client who weighs 150 lb, works a desk job and gets little to no activity during work hours. Eat more or less depending on your current bodyweight and activity level.
  • It goes without saying that these diets will work only if this imaginary client consistently eats as laid out. And if it isn’t clear, he needs to train hard and smart to see results.
  • Meat eaters – any and all meat needs to be organic and free range or grass-fed or wild caught (as the case may be).
  • All dairy needs to be organic and preferably grass fed.
  • Any whey protein needs to be high in protein (> 20 g per scoop) and low in fat (<3 g), carbs (<5 g), sodium (<15%) and cholesterol (<10%).

– – – – – x – – – – –

Case 1: Health & Longevity

  • Eat about 0.5 gram per pound of bodyweight.
  • Eat enough real food carbs and real food fats.
  • Eat to satiety. Stop before you’re full.

– – – – – x – – – – –

Case 2: Fat Loss

Training:

  • Strength training 3 days/week
  • HIT (Eg. sprints) 1 day/week
  • Low intensity cardio (Eg. walking) on rest days

What to eat on training days:

  • 0.75-1 lb lean meat (Eg. chicken breast, chicken thigh, white fish, lean beef, lean pork)
  • 2-3 organic cage free whole eggs
  • 2-2.5 lb mixed fibrous vegetables (Eg. broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage, asparagus, mushrooms, zucchini)
  • 1 cup mixed fruit or 1 medium fruit
  • 1/2 large avocado
  • 1 cup whole milk or whole milk yogurt
  • 1-2 oz cheese or 2-4 tbls cream
  • 1-2 tbls oil (coconut oil/butter/ghee/olive oil)
  • 1 scoop whey protein
  • 200 calories worth of benign starch (cooked white rice or tubers)

What to eat on rest days:

  • 0.75-1 lb moderately fatty meat (Eg. 85/15 ground beef, steak, salmon, bone-in pork chop)
  • 2-3 organic cage free whole eggs
  • 2-2.5 lb mixed fibrous vegetables (Eg. broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage, asparagus, mushrooms, zucchini)
  • 1-2 tbls oil (coconut oil/butter/ghee/olive oil)

When to eat what:

  • Number of meals can be 1 or 10.
  • Each meal should contain protein.
  • Starches and protein supplements need to be consumed in the post-workout meal only.

Substitutions for vegetarians:

  • 1/4 lb Paneer/tofu/tempeh + 1 scoop whey in place of 1 lb of lean meat.
  • 1/4 lb Paneer/tofu/tempeh + 1 scoop of whey in place of 3/4 lb of moderately fatty meat.
  • 5-6 egg whites and a cup of cottage cheese will be required to meet protein requirements.

– – – – – x – – – – –

Case 3: Strength Gain

Training:

  • Strength training 3 days/week
  • Low intensity cardio (walking etc.) on other days

What to eat on training days:

  • 1-1.5 lb moderately fatty meat (Eg. 85/15 ground beef, steak, salmon, bone-in pork chop)
  • 3-4 organic cage free whole eggs
  • 2-2.5 lb mixed fibrous vegetables (Eg. broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage, asparagus, mushrooms, zucchini)
  • 3-4 cups fruit
  • 2-3 cup whole milk or whole milk yogurt
  • 1/4 cup nuts
  • 2-3 tbls oil (coconut oil/butter/ghee/olive oil)
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 2-3 scoop whey protein **
  • 500 calories worth of benign starch (cooked white rice or tubers)

What to eat on rest days:

  • 1-1.5 lb moderately fatty meat (Eg. 85/15 ground beef, steak, salmon, bone-in pork chop)
  • 3-4 organic cage free whole eggs
  • 2-2.5 lb mixed fibrous vegetables (Eg. broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage, asparagus, mushrooms, zucchini)
  • 3-4 cups fruit
  • 1 cup whole milk or whole milk yogurt
  • 2 tbls oil (coconut oil/butter/ghee/olive oil)

When to eat what:

  • Eat at least 3 meals per day to ensure adequate calories are consumed.
  • Each meal should contain a significant amount of protein and calories.
  • Whey protein can be consumed throughout the day whenever protein is required.
  • Starch is put to best use when consumed in the post-workout meal.

Substitutions for vegetarians:

  • 1/4 lb Paneer/tofu/tempeh + 1 scoop whey in place of 1 lb of lean meat.
  • 1/4 lb Paneer/tofu/tempeh + 1 scoop of whey in place of 3/4 lb of moderately fatty meat.
  • 5-6 egg whites and a cup of cottage cheese will be required to meet protein requirements.
  • An extra cup of milk/yogurt will be required to get adequate calories.

– – – – – x – – – – –

Case 4: Endurance

Training:

  • 60+ min endurance training 3 days/week
  • 1 strength training session/week
  • 1 yoga session/week
  • 2 rest days/week

What to eat on endurance training days:

  • 0.5-75 lb lean meat (Eg. chicken breast, chicken thigh, white fish, lean beef, lean pork)
  • 2 organic cage free whole eggs
  • 2-2.5 lb mixed fibrous vegetables (Eg. broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage, asparagus, mushrooms, zucchini)
  • 700-800 calories worth of benign starch (Eg. cooked white rice, tubers)
  • 300-400 calories worth of fruit or dried fruit
  • 300-400 calories worth of squashes and root vegetables (Eg. butternut squash, beetroot)
  • 1 tbls oil (coconut oil/butter/ghee/olive oil)

What to eat on rest days:

  • 75-1 lb moderately fatty meat (Eg. 85/15 ground beef, steak, salmon, bone-in pork chop)
  • 2 organic cage free whole eggs
  • 2-2.5 lb mixed fibrous vegetables (Eg. broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, cabbage, asparagus, mushrooms, zucchini)
  • 300-400 calories worth of squashes and root vegetables (Eg. butternut squash, beetroot)
  • 300-400 calories worth of fruit or dried fruit
  • 1 tbls oil (coconut oil/butter/ghee/olive oil)

When to eat what:

  • Eat at least 3 meals per day on endurance training days to ensure the body is fueled adequately.
  • Each endurance training day meal should contain starch and/or fruit.
  • Refer fat loss section for strength training day guidelines.

Substitutions for vegetarians:

  • 1/4 lb Paneer/tofu/tempeh + 1 scoop whey in place of 1 lb of lean meat.
  • 1/4 lb Paneer/tofu/tempeh + 1 scoop of whey in place of 3/4 lb of moderately fatty meat.

– – – – – x – – – – –

Why is ‘eat real food’ special?

1. There are many diets that will help you lose weight or gain strength or provide calories for endurance activities, but how many diets actually help you reach these goals while making you healthy? Any idiot can come up with a diet plan that has the required macronutrient split, but show me a diet plan that is as packed with micronutrients!

2. Any calorie restricted diet will help you lose weight. But it will also leave you hungry, weak and depressed if it is filled with grains and fruit juices . On the other hand, a real food based diet, which is 95% whole real foods, will leave you energized, satiated and strong.

3. High protein/fat/carb diets are not sustainable in the long run and results in repeated ‘falling off the wagon’. The ‘eat real food’ diet plan contains enough of all three macronutrients which lends itself to great tasting recipes which in turn results in long term adherence. You’ve got meat, cheese, veggies, fruit, nuts, dairy, rice and other starches to play around with. What more do you need?

– – – – – x – – – – –

Summary:

I understand that this is probably not the usual ‘diet plan’ you see on other websites. But, as you know, I like to keep things real and legit. Once you have a list of what you need to eat, you can figure out when and how you want to eat them. I believe in ‘freedom within constraints’ since it always makes people more creative, in control, accountable and hence more successful.

How do these things come together? What “meals” should I eat Raj?

Seriously? Maybe we’ll find a time that works for both of us and I can feed you? Figure out your own meals! If you eat what is listed, your macros will be pretty much spot on and how you eat them doesn’t matter as much (as long as you don’t destroy the food in the name of cooking!). Make foods that suit your style and cuisine. Start by looking at recipes that I have previously posted in the blog and visiting www.eatrealfood.in regularly where you can find a bunch real food recipes.

If you need more guidance with respect to nutrition (and training) and have questions on more intricate aspects like meal pairing, meal timing, meal frequency, allergies etc. you can always make use of the online consultation and telephone consultation options that I offer. Email me requesting a consultation and we’ll take it from there. And if you’re new around here, be sure to join my Facebook group for recipes and a wealth of information regarding nutrition and follow me on twitter to stay abreast of all the latest nutrition and fitness mumbo jumbo.

So what do you guys think? Too much food? Too little? Questions/comments/concerns… please post in the comments section. I’ll look forward to reading your thoughts!

Peace out.

Introducing EatRealFood.in

What if you can eat pure bliss like this all day everyday while you lose fat, get healthier and look awesome? Well… you’re in luck! Cos now you can! Read on.

We heard you!

We heard you say…

We get the real food concept! We understand the rules! We are ready to do it! But… how do we put this stuff together and make it a meal? And how can we come up with tasty and healthy meals on a daily basis??

And we decided to put our heads together and give you an ultimate solution to this problem. Introducing our brand spanking new food blog…

About EatRealFood.in:

From the many articles we have written on nutrition (here and here) and the many clients we have personally worked with, we observed a trend –

People are hesitant to try our recommendations initially but once they give it an honest attempt… well, they get addicted! Addicted to feeling good, looking great and eating lots of delectable food!

When we looked into this further, we realized that the reason most people are hesitant to try it at first is, not because they don’t understand the concept, but because they are intimidated about cooking palatable food on a daily basis. Folks just didn’t want to sign up for something that will leave them with hardly any options to eat!

Our typical conversation goes something like this…

They: What is the healthiest way to eat?

Us: Eat vegetables, meat, seafood, eggs, dairy, fruit and nuts. Stay away from junk, grains, legumes, vegetable oils and sugars.

They: No grains? No beans? No oils? How many meals can you really cook with this? I don’t think I can do such an extreme diet!

Guess what? You can make a gazillion different meals without grains and sugars and junk! And that’s exactly what we want to prove with EatRealFood.in

How to design and create foods that are undeniably delicious and unbelievably nutritious… all at the same time!

So what can you find  at EatRealFood.in?

  • Recipes
  • Food porn
  • Nutritional information about various foods

What are the guidelines under which these recipes are created?

You can get the full scoop of our dietary recommendations here.

Will the recipes be vegetarian friendly?

Absolutely! We respect people’s food preferences and will do everything we can to make EatRealFood.in a happy camping ground for vegetarians and meat-eaters alike. And moreover, three of the five bloggers who contribute to EatRealFood.in are vegetarians!

How can you be involved?

We want to keep the atmosphere at EatRealFood.in inviting and fun. So please take a couple of seconds to comment on the recipes we post and if you have any suggestions for recipes or have some recipes that fit the bill, please email it to us. We will post it up and provide you with the credit you deserve! Fair enough right?

So hop on to EatRealFood.in, find out more about the chefs food fanatics and please spread the word!

Help us help you eat better!

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